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Rosie is a mother and photographer from the Uk. 

 

Rosie specialises in photographing natural and un-retouched portraits, mostly of women and nearly always on 35mm film. 

 

Interview for Refinery29 U.K about her recent involvement in Girls Uninterrupted, an exhibition which featured female artists from around the globe focusing on censorship and women's issues: 

What are the main themes in your art?
The female body, in all its glory! I love to photograph the less obvious women and I tend to steer away from anyone too ‘groomed’. I’ve always felt a little on the outside of mainstream fashion or society and I like to reflect that in my work. I’m also aware that women have been heavily sexualised so I like to offer a female perspective on what is sexy and attractive in a woman. For me, that is often softness and strength and I love an unapologetic stare.

Tell me a bit about your pieces on show...
The nude of Georgie is part of a series of images of her and her husband. We were all hungover and sleepy on the shoot day so I decided to go with that vibe. I love how soft her body looks but how obviously strong and fine with her stripped-back appearance she is. A lot of people I photograph immediately go into the more common poses that we see in fashion. I think she looks like a beautiful classical nude painting.

What does having your art uncensored mean to you?
That the women I have photographed get to look as absolutely beautiful as they are, no cover-ups. It literally hurts my heart to have to cover up their nipples or their vaginas.

Why do you think it’s important for women’s art to be uncensored?
As much as I disagree with the inequality of censoring and I think it’s really OTT, I also know that there is a line that some people will cross and it can be difficult to define where that line would be drawn. I wouldn't want my kids stumbling across porn online before they are of an age to understand what it is but I also don't want them to think that women should be covering up the very parts of their bodies that give life. This is one of the reasons why my house is covered in my work – in the living room, the bathroom, and the hallway. There are photos of boobies in pretty much every room of the house.

Why do you think art for and by women still has the power to provoke shock?
I think it’s because we are finally starting to talk about all the 'gross' stuff that our bodies have been doing since the beginning of the human race. I don't know why that is so shocking but I think it’s great. The more we talk, the less shocking it gets and then we'll hopefully go on to talk more openly about the more serious things that women have to experience. We're just warming up.

Do you think now is an exciting time for women in the art world?
Yes, it’s awesome! I wish I could have seen some of the art I’m seeing now when I was a teenager – maybe then I wouldn't have been so ashamed of my body and its functions. I had terrible lessons around sex and my body. Girls these days are being encouraged by the art world to stand up...and in some ways, this was previously lacking.